BLOG.CW&T

and scribbles with a super dope writing instrument.

rtf-n:

Some more wireframes for temporal dead reckoning training app (needs a name!)

rtf-n:

I’ve been thinking about how to train myself to become better a temporal dead reckoner.  I want to build a more accurate sense of time.  The goal for now is to sense of 3 mins precisely.  Could I train myself to know what 3 minutes feels like?  I feel like I could if I try hard enough.
So to help me get there, I’m building an app. Here’s a wireframe for an app to test and train temporal dead reckoning. I use the volume buttons as input, so you don’t have to be looking at the screen to know where to press.  The graph tracks each attempt. After 10 successful attempts (getting within 10% of the goal) you move to the next level.  
The app starts at 1 second (level 1). Press the volume button to start the stopwatch. The numbers scramble randomly and at random intervals (so you can use it a measure).  Press the button again to stop as close to 1 second as you can.  Land within 0.1 second of 1 second ten times consecutively and move to the next level of difficulty (2 seconds)….and so on.  How far could I get?
Of course if I do it staring at a clock, I’d only be cheating myself. This isn’t a competition.  It’s an experiment.  Can I teach my brain to tune my subjective sense of time through a simple timing exercise.
Drummers would probably be really good at this.  Maybe monks would be good at sensing long increments times. I think it would be amazing and beautiful to have such an accurate and precise sense of time that you could close your eyes, meditate, and open them an hour later knowing exactly an hour had passed.
I think most of us value a good sense of spacial orientation, distances, and hold some kind of mental map of our surroundings.  So, why not a mental map of our position in time?
Getting lost in time is easy. Read a book, watch a good movie, play a video game, get immersed in pretty much any intense activity and time will fly. We can also slow it down by boring ourselves, doing some repetitive task or getting locked up in solitary confinement.  But what about being in perfect sync with time?

rtf-n:

I’ve been thinking about how to train myself to become better a temporal dead reckoner.  I want to build a more accurate sense of time.  The goal for now is to sense of 3 mins precisely.  Could I train myself to know what 3 minutes feels like?  I feel like I could if I try hard enough.

So to help me get there, I’m building an app. Here’s a wireframe for an app to test and train temporal dead reckoning. I use the volume buttons as input, so you don’t have to be looking at the screen to know where to press.  The graph tracks each attempt. After 10 successful attempts (getting within 10% of the goal) you move to the next level.  

The app starts at 1 second (level 1). Press the volume button to start the stopwatch. The numbers scramble randomly and at random intervals (so you can use it a measure).  Press the button again to stop as close to 1 second as you can.  Land within 0.1 second of 1 second ten times consecutively and move to the next level of difficulty (2 seconds)….and so on.  How far could I get?

Of course if I do it staring at a clock, I’d only be cheating myself. This isn’t a competition.  It’s an experiment.  Can I teach my brain to tune my subjective sense of time through a simple timing exercise.

Drummers would probably be really good at this.  Maybe monks would be good at sensing long increments times. I think it would be amazing and beautiful to have such an accurate and precise sense of time that you could close your eyes, meditate, and open them an hour later knowing exactly an hour had passed.

I think most of us value a good sense of spacial orientation, distances, and hold some kind of mental map of our surroundings.  So, why not a mental map of our position in time?

Getting lost in time is easy. Read a book, watch a good movie, play a video game, get immersed in pretty much any intense activity and time will fly. We can also slow it down by boring ourselves, doing some repetitive task or getting locked up in solitary confinement.  But what about being in perfect sync with time?

Best custom neon surprise late wedding present ever! From @veerchacha & @chesterprescott

Best custom neon surprise late wedding present ever! From @veerchacha & @chesterprescott

Sketch of a sky deck I am designing in culver city, ca

Sketch of a sky deck I am designing in culver city, ca

New wallet based on old wallet based on paper hotel key holders. #bestwallet #designedbyanonymous

New wallet based on old wallet based on paper hotel key holders. #bestwallet #designedbyanonymous

I pulled the trigger on this single use stopwatch today (prototype testing). Today happens to also be John Glenn’s 93rd birthday. 
Glenn was the first American to orbit earth (1962). On his mission he hacked a stopwatch to fit over his spacesuit on his wrist. That was the only piece of tech he wore other than the suit itself.  #timefromlaunch

I pulled the trigger on this single use stopwatch today (prototype testing). Today happens to also be John Glenn’s 93rd birthday.
Glenn was the first American to orbit earth (1962). On his mission he hacked a stopwatch to fit over his spacesuit on his wrist. That was the only piece of tech he wore other than the suit itself. #timefromlaunch

timefromlaunch:

Boards for the single use stopwatch have arrived! Time to stuff them and see if i could get a first prototype to work…

timefromlaunch:

Here’s a small test of the thermal energy harvesting circuit.  It needs a few degrees of temperature difference.

Mammalian cell culture robot! #tapbiosystems (at Technology Square)

Mammalian cell culture robot! #tapbiosystems (at Technology Square)

rtf-n:

The giant knob is probably better in the middle.  With the board separated from the screen, the form factor got much thinner.  The case is 3D printed in two parts, then crazyglued together.

timefromlaunch:

Here’s the first board design.  An atmega2560 connected to a 8 digit 7-segment e-ink display, powered by a coin cell battery.  
The idea is to keep the battery separated from the pad with a piece of plastic that sticks out the side of the device.  When that pin is pulled the battery connects and the circuit powers up.  Once it’s powered up, the 7-segment updates every second to show the current hours, minutes and seconds from launch.  Since there are only 8 digits, the display will continue to shift to only show the most significant digits as time increases.  So eventually, the display will only show days and will refresh once a day. The max number of days the device will count in this scenario is approximately 273785 years (99999999 days).  The battery would die much sooner than that.  
To stop the counter, the device needs to be snapped in half.  There are perforations between the display and the main chip.  If and when the board is broken in half, all 50 pins connecting the display to the chip are severed and are no longer updated.  Since it’s an e-ink display, it will continue to show the time it stopped counting without any power.

timefromlaunch:

Here’s the first board design.  An atmega2560 connected to a 8 digit 7-segment e-ink display, powered by a coin cell battery.  

The idea is to keep the battery separated from the pad with a piece of plastic that sticks out the side of the device.  When that pin is pulled the battery connects and the circuit powers up.  Once it’s powered up, the 7-segment updates every second to show the current hours, minutes and seconds from launch.  Since there are only 8 digits, the display will continue to shift to only show the most significant digits as time increases.  So eventually, the display will only show days and will refresh once a day. The max number of days the device will count in this scenario is approximately 273785 years (99999999 days).  The battery would die much sooner than that.  

To stop the counter, the device needs to be snapped in half.  There are perforations between the display and the main chip.  If and when the board is broken in half, all 50 pins connecting the display to the chip are severed and are no longer updated.  Since it’s an e-ink display, it will continue to show the time it stopped counting without any power.

Energy harvesting ambient temperature changes to power a Casio F-91W

Energy harvesting ambient temperature changes to power a Casio F-91W

For those wondering the WCE v STK is West Coast Eagles v St Kilda Australian Rules Football match (AFL) we were flying to attend.

For those wondering the WCE v STK is West Coast Eagles v St Kilda Australian Rules Football match (AFL) we were flying to attend.

It’s a long time since I received my Pen Type-A via Kickstarter. That was a thoroughly interesting experience to watch the trials of the  manufacture process. I remain very impressed with CW&T’s frankness and tenacity to get the pen done with awesome quality.Having had the pen for a long time I struggled to use it … Just wasn’t working for me then recently I grabbed a few 0.5mm Hi Tec-C refills and it all started to feel right. The 0.3mm refills just weren’t right for me.Anyways … A doodle attached … another to follow.

It’s a long time since I received my Pen Type-A via Kickstarter. That was a thoroughly interesting experience to watch the trials of the  manufacture process. I remain very impressed with CW&T’s frankness and tenacity to get the pen done with awesome quality.

Having had the pen for a long time I struggled to use it … Just wasn’t working for me then recently I grabbed a few 0.5mm Hi Tec-C refills and it all started to feel right. The 0.3mm refills just weren’t right for me.

Anyways … A doodle attached … another to follow.